“Fist fights could turn into shootouts”: Concerns about Concealed Carry on Campus

The last three blog posts detailed the reasons why concealed carry on campus might be perceived as the ‘solution’ to the threat of school shootings and other types of crime. Conversely, the quotation in the title evinces that there are those who are concerned that the presence of firearms might lead to further violence. One particular concern expressed by a number of YouTube users was that the young age of most students might hinder their ability to make rational decisions; hence, meaning that physical confrontations could be exacerbated by students carrying guns, perhaps even leading to serious injuries and deaths. Further to this, the presence of alcohol and drugs on campus — particularly in dorms where parties take place — was believed to impair the judgment of those carrying firearms. The idea of students as drunken, emotionally immature and irresponsible relies on stereotypical schemata: mentally stored ideas forming perceptions. (1) In contrast, there were YouTube users who challenged the claims, stating not all students use alcohol and drugs and it is hypocritical not to trust students since they are intelligent enough to be receiving a higher education.

On the other side of the argument, there were some YouTube commentators who supported concealed carry on campus in theory; yet, drawing from their own college and university experiences, maintained that certain students they knew could not be trusted to carry firearms. Other users argued that firearms on campus were quite a frightening prospect, so it removed the security and freedom of all students. This brings to mind a point made by about car park signs reserving spaces near the door for female drivers: this is meant to reassure them but could also serve to remind them there is a ‘threat’ in that environment. (2) A similar scenario could be applicable to concealed carry on campus where the presence of weapons or the knowledge that there was the possibility students have the potential to be legally armed could trigger more fear.

In a compromise of sorts, some users then were supportive of the idea but with general conditions: 1) not allowing students to carry whilst drinking alcohol; 2) requiring more training for permit holders to carry on campus, perhaps from law enforcement officials; 3) obtaining a full background check, perhaps even asking their professors for references; 4) carrying guns in a holster as ones in backpacks could be easily triggered or stolen. One user even suggested that it could be an impetus for students achieving a higher standard of grades, where they had to maintain their scores in order to be allowed to carry. It, therefore, seems that for concealed carry on campus to ever gain widespread support certain conditions will have to be met — the safety and security of students, staff and visitors has to be the first priority in any policies implemented.

[This blog post was put together using results from analysing comments from relevant YouTube videos and further reading in this area. This blog wraps up the topic of concealed carry on campus, which has been the focus of School Shooting Research for the past few months — the topic will be revisited in an upcoming blog, when the practicalities of translating concealed carry into successful self-defence against a school shooter are critiqued.]

  • For further details see: Entman R. M. (1993) ‘Framing: toward clarification of a fractured paradigm.’ Journal of Communication 43(4), 51-58.
  • An idea discussed in Gabriel, U. and W. Greve. (2003) ‘The Psychology of Fear of Crime: Conceptual and Methodological Perspectives.’ British Journal of Criminology 43(3), 600-614.
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